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Frame of Mind posts for "Anthony Taormina"

Point BreakSomewhere between timeless classics and forgettable throwaways, there exists a wide catalogue of movies that could benefit from a modern day reboot but would likely fall under the radar if not executed perfectly. Point Break is one such movie. While the original Point Break (1991) is by no means a masterpiece, it's still a decent action caper featuring some delightfully cheesy performances by Patrick Swayze (Roadhouse) and Keanu Reeves (John Wick). A reckless cop enlists with a group of surfers who turn out to be bank robbers, and his close connection with them clouds his judgment. It's pretty standard fare by now, informing future action movies such as Fast and the Furious. Point Break (2015) takes the loose threads of the original and repackages them in the world of extreme sports. Our hero is still a reckless novice named Johnny Utah (Luke Bracey) and opposite him is a fearsome, death-defying thrill chaser named Bodhi (Edgar Ramirez from Deliver Us From Evil). But somewhere in between conception and execution, Point Break either lost focus or started coming apart at the seams, and the end result feels like a movie cobbled together by one poorly conceived plot point after the next.

'Star Wars: The Force Awakens'After over a decade of waiting, even longer if you’ve wiped the three prequel’s from your mind, Star Wars is back in a big way. Star Wars: The Force Awakens, Episode 7 in the franchise, has arrived, and brought with it a new direction. Like the original films, The Force Awakens is all about myth building and discovery, creating a mystique that slowly unravels as the 2-hour plus space tale unfolds. We see and hear the familiar sights and sounds of the galaxy far, far away, but it isn’t long before it becomes clear that this is Star Wars for the modern age, thanks in part to the gender and race blind casting.

Chris Hemsworth as Thor, Thor: The Dark WorldWhile the first Thor – released in 2011 – was a suitable introduction to the Marvel Comics character Thor, it was also a fairly tepid approach to what is one of the more cosmic members of the Avengers team. Up until that point, moviegoers had been treated to a Marvel world that existed in a realm where most of the superheroes seemed plausible, if not completely believable. Iron Man was a guy rich enough to build himself a super suit, the Hulk a man who was caught on the wrong end of Gamma radiation, Captain America a super soldier, and so on. Thor, on the other hand, is the God of thunder, and literally occupies a completely different realm from those previously mentioned characters.

The World's End PosterThe World's End is a film that cannot be summed up succinctly or without meandering off into a tangent or two. A face value it's a story about reuniting with old friends and squashing, or rehashing, decades-old squabbles, but just underneath the surface is an homage to the body-swapping flicks of the '50s. Buried even deeper, almost as a meta film, The World's End is the final piece of "The Three Flavors Cornetto Trilogy," a loosely connected series of films that started with Shaun of the Dead (2004) and continued with Hot Fuzz (2007).

Kim Kold as Dennis in Teddy BearAnother year has gone by at FilmFracture and it has been full of great movies, mediocre trips to the cinema, and some downright awful wastes of time.  With that said, here are the best and worst movies of 2012, based solely on their Production ratings (how they faired in other categories may have been better, or the same, click out on the titles to see for yourself).  I must warn you, our choices for the best movies may come as quite a shock--who would have thought a Troma picture would make a best of list? 

Brad Pitt as Jackie Cogan in KILLING THEM SOFTLY  Photo: Melinda Sue Gordon © 2011 Cogan’s ProductionsHappy Holidays, everyone.  This year the FilmFracture team brings you the most anticipated, and must see movies, of the 2012 Holiday Movie Season.  Some may be obvious--The Hobbit--others not so much--Silent Night--but they are coming to theatres to make your holiday a little more bright, while being spent in the dark.   

Daniel Craig stars as James Bond in Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Pictures/Columbia Pictures/EON Productions’ action adventure SKYFALL. PHOTO BY: Francois Duhamel COPYRIGHT: Skyfall ©2011 Danjaq, LLC, United Artists Corporation, Columbia Pictures Industries, Inc. All rights reserved.Thus far Daniel Craig's James Bond films – Casino Royale and Quantum of Solace – have been a mixed bag. While the former was a successful reinvention of agent 007 the latter threw most of those intriguing concepts away in favor of a humdrum story about water being our most precious resource. However, despite the inferior quality of Quantum of Solace there was a belief that Craig's Bond was still a viable hero, one that could be redeemed. And thankfully MGM too saw fit to keep the property alive with Craig, and will this week deliver the third Bond adventure for Craig (23rd for Bond), Skyfall.

Movie News | Trailers | Events | Goodies"Anthony Taormina"

ChefIt is a special treat when a movie like Chef is created. A film full of heart that brings out your emotions organically, without the need for gimmicks or special circumstance. Jon Favreau's Chef deserves the accolades it has received thus far since release in May and those that are sure to follow come awards season (fingers crossed).  Chef is being re-released in theatres for a special engagement begininning August 29, 2014. If you did not have a chance to catch this gem of a film before in theatres now is your chance--and do not pass it up.

X-Men: Days of Future PastIt may be Memorial Day Weekend, meaning there is one more day for people to flock to the cinemas before returning to work, but the weekend box office officially comes to a close today.  As expected, X-Men: Days of Future Past has won the top box office spot, pulling in an estimated $90.7 million over three days. Deadline reports it had a significant drop of 18% since Friday--never a good thing.  X-Men: Days of Future Past did not do as well as last week's BIG opener Godzilla, with a total of $93.1 million. There is still time for the final amounts to be adjusted, so anything can happen.

Miles Teller and Shailene Woodley in The Spectacular NowOne of the best reviewed films of the year is The Spectacular Now, and indie darling from director James Ponsoldt, with a script by (500) Days Of Summer's hugely-talented Scott Neustadter and Michael H. Weber.  The Spectacular Now is expanding into more theatres/markets on August 16, 2013 and San Diego, California is very lucky to have one of the stars of the film, Miles Teller (Footloose (2011)) hosting Q&A's at the opening day shows.  

Park Chan-Wook Retrospective FlyerTo celebrate the release of Park Chan-Wook's amazing new film Stoker, Reading Cinemas in San Diego -- home to two of the FilmFracture writing team, James Jay Edwards and Anthony Taormina -- and KPBS film critic Beth Accomando are hosting a Chan-Wook retrospective.  The retrospective will include the movies Sympathy For Mr. Vengeance (2002), Oldboy (2004), and Lady Vengeance (2005), and feature opening remarks by Accomando.